Eyes on the World, Future in Hand – Horizon 2006 Chinese Opinion Polls (06-19)

Key Issues
  • Where do the Chinese learn about the world
  • The relationship between China and other countries
  • How do the Chinese view China
  • How do the Chinese view the United States
  • How do the Chinese view Japan
Dates Conducted

April, August, October and December 2006

Date Released

Abridged data report published on December 14, 2006 by Horizon

Methodology

The poll was conducted in 10 major cities across China throughout the year of 2006. For research purposes, the interviewees in the survey were divided into two categories: the general public (local residents over the age of 18) and elites (academic experts, returnees from overseas, business leaders, media experts and university students).

Developer

Horizon Research Consultancy Group (www.horizon-china.com/servlet/Page?Node=8724 ) is one of the most prominent Chinese local management consulting and market research companies.

Background

The year 2006 was busy for China as it geared up for the Olympic Games in 2008. On the foreign policy front, North Korea conducted a missile test in July and a nuclear test in October, thereby disregarding Beijing’s disapproval of the tests. In response to the crisis, China played a major role in revitalizing the six-party talks. The end of Koizumi Junichiro’s tenure as prime minister of Japan, followed by the subsequent visit to China by the new prime minister, Abe Shinzo, received highly positive feedback from the Chinese side. Nevertheless, differences between Tokyo and Beijing are still agitated by territorial disputes in the East China Sea. In 2006, China also reached out to the world with a series of high-profile events, including the Sino-Russia summit, the second round of the Sino-Europe Strategic Dialogue, the Sino-ASEAN Summit and the Sino-Africa Forum, during which China waived all the debt owed to it from African nations. Regarding Sino-U.S. relations, attention was largely paid to economic issues. After President Hu’s visit to the U.S., U.S. Secretary of Treasury Paul Paulson took over the initiative in the currency/trade negotiations with China. As a result, the RMB has been appreciating, marking a 5 percent appreciation in total for the whole year.

Survey

Where Chinese people learn about the world

Question 1. What are the sources of information (national and international news) for the general public and the elites in China?

Finding: In China, the general public learns about national and international news by watching TV while elites learn through the Internet.

 

Q2. What are the most often used media channels for the general public and the elites to learn about national and international news?

The top 5 most often used websites for the general public

The top 5 most often used websites for the elites

The top 5 most often watched TV channels for the general public

The top 5 most watched TV channels for the elites


Finding:
- CCTV 1, and sina.com rank as the main methods for both the general public and the elites to obtain information.

 

Q3. What newspapers do the Chinese read to get information?
The top 10 most often read newspapers for the general public


The top 10 most often read newspapers for the elites


Finding:
- In China, the general public obtains information more often through local newspapers while the elites rely more on comprehensive newspapers with greater numbers of political, economic and social columns.

 

The relationship between China and other countries

Q1. Which country do you think is most friendly with China?
The most friendly countries/region with China in the elites’ eyes

The most friendly countries/region with China in the general public’s eyes


Finding:
- Both the general public and the elites regard Russia as the most friendly country with China. The elites believe African countries are the second most friendly with China while the general public believes neighboring North Korea is the second most friendly country with China.

 

Q2. Which economy do think is most important for China?

The most important economy for China in the elites’ eyes

The most important economy for China in the general public’s eyes.

 

Q3. Which country do you think is China’s partner on security issues and which country do you think poses a threat to China’s security?

China’s partner on security issues in the eyes of the elites


China’s partner on security issues in the eyes of the general public

The country that poses the largest threat to China’s interests in the eyes of the elites

The country that poses the largest threat to China’s interests in the eyes of the general public

Q4. Which are the countries that share the most common interests with China?
(The data uses 4-point scale. Point 4 represents the most common interests; point 1 represents no common interests at all)
Q4-A. Which country shares the most economic interests with China?

Q4-B Which country shares the most security interests with China?

Q4-C. Which country should China keep the closest relationship with?

 

Chinese view of China
Q1. What role should China play in the following international issues?
(the general public)

 

Q2. What role should China play in the following international issues?
(the elites)

Findings:
- The general public believes UN and other international organizations should play the largest role in solving international issues while China should carry certain major responsibilities on issues such as reducing global warming.
- The elites regard China as the most important leader to ensure the Korean peninsula’s peace and stability.

 

Chinese view of the United States

Q1. How do you view the United States?
(The data uses 4-point scale. Point 4 represents very favorable; point 1 represents not favorable at all)

USA favorability among the general public from 2001- 2006

 

Q2. Do you think the United States poses a threat to China?

 

Q3. How important do you think the United States is to China economically?

 

Q4. What are the reasons why you like the United States?

The top 3 reasons why the general public likes the United States

 

Q5. What is your impression of American people and American culture?

 

Q6. If you don’t like the United States, why?
The top 3 reasons Chinese people don’t like the United States

 

Q7. Which one of the following elements do you think is the greatest threat to world peace over the next five years?

 

Q8. What do you think of the U.S. influence on the world?

 

Q9. What do you think the United States will be alike in the next 5-10 years?
(the general public & the elites)

 

Q10. What is your opinion of the current Sino-U.S. relationship?

 

Q11. How important do you think the Sino-US relationship is?

 

Q12. What do you think are the Americans’ attitude towards China? (the general public and the elites)

 

Q13. What do you think the Sino-U.S. relationship will look like in the next 5-10 years?
(the general public and the elites)

 

Q14. How much common interest do you think China and the United States share in the following areas? (The data uses 4-point scale. Point 4 represents most common interests; Point 1 represents no common interest at all)


Chinese view of Japan
Q1. How do you view the following countries? (The data uses 4-point scale. Point 4 represents highly favorable;Point 1 represents not favorable at all)

 

Q2. What do you think Japan’s power will be in 5 to 10 years?

Japan in the next 5-10 years in the eyes of the general public

Japan in the next 5-10 years in the eyes of the elites

 

Q3. What are the top 5 reasons why you don’t like Japan?

Q4. In what way do you think the difficulties in the Sino-Japanese relations should be resolved?

 

Q5. What do you think the future Sino-Japanese relations will be?

 

Q6. What do you think the future relationship between Japan and China will be in 5-10 years?

Disclaimer

The Mansfield Foundation is responsible for the translation of this Asahi Shimbun poll, subject to the Mansfield Foundation terms of use (see below).

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