Network Commentary

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs), Mark Manyin (Specialist in Asian Affairs), and Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs), all with the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to an updated CRS report on U.S.-South Korea Relations published June 21, 2014.  Ms. Chanlett-Avery also contributed to a June 19, 2014 CRS report on “Thailand:  Background and U.S. Relations.

 

In “Making the Case for a More Robust Regional Security Architecture in the Asia-Pacific,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) notes that three functions performed by a regional security architecture “– facilitating cooperation, defining expectations of appropriateness, and engaging all states regardless of size — are important given the need to adapt to the new conditions of distributed power and increasingly complex security problems.”  He concludes that the United States needs to make a stronger case for an Asia-Pacific RSA “by focusing on these very basic functions.”  This editorial was published on the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies’ website June 16, 2014.

 

In a June 5, 2014 op-ed in The National Interest U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia—Pacific Center for Security Studies) takes a closer look at the incident behind the “verbal barbs”  Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese Lieutenant General Wang Guanzhong traded at the recent Shangri-La Dialogue and notes these barbs “reflect an increasingly dangerous situation playing out in the East China Sea that carries real-world consequences that may prove difficult to deescalate.” Dr. Hornrung suggests that “because the status quo is becoming increasingly risky, it behooves Beijing and Tokyo to take action to manage the situation.”

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth University) wrote about China’s “ongoing effort to wield the history weapon against Japan” and how to change the conversation in East Asia in an April 6, 2014 op-ed in Aljazeera America.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin (Congressional Research Service, CRS) and his CRS colleague Mary Beth Nikitin recently updated their report to Congress on foreign assistance to North Korea.  A pdf of the April 2, 2014 report is available atwww.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R40095.pdf.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was interviewed by Voice of America about the March meeting between President Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Abe, and South Korean President Park on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit.  Please click here to listen to the March 25, 2014, segment.

 

In “Mending Japan-S.Korea Ties,” an op-ed published in the Japan Times March 7, 2014, Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described current strains in Japan-South Korea relations and said Tokyo and Seoul should “refrain from looking to the United States to mediate their dispute.” “While Washington can encourage its allies toward better behavior,” he concluded, “Park and Abe need to demonstrate leadership through words, deeds and bilateral dialogue.”

 

Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Peace Winds America) evaluated the U.S. response to Prime Minister Abe’s December 2013 visit to Yasukuni Shrine in an interview published in Dispatch Japan March 11, 2014.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was quoted in a February 22, 2014 New York Times article about the latest annual training event for U.S. Marines and soldiers from Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force, which took place in California in January and February 2014.

 

New York Times article about the latest annual training event for U.S. Marines and soldiers from Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force, which took place in California in January and February 2014.

 

Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery and Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin, both Specialists in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to updated reports on U.S-South Korea relations and Japan-U.S. relations published in mid-February 2014.

 

Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros shares his views on Prime Minister Abe’s first year in office and his visit to Yasukuni Shrine in “Does Abe’s Rightward Shift Threaten His Legacy?,” published in the January 7 PacNet Newsletter.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) authored a recent article on China’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the Asahi Shimbun (subscription required) and co-authored a January 10 article on “Beijing’s Grand Strategy Failure” in The National Interest.

 

In a January 1 opinion piece in the Japan Times, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future advisory committee member Ezra Vogel (Harvard University) writes that current tensions between Japan and China “cannot be eliminated without confronting the passions stemming from unresolved historical issues that arose beginning late in the 19th century when Japan modernized first.” Dr. Vogel examines some of the difficulties between Japan and China and recommends steps each country could take to improve the relationship.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service) examines the Abe administration’s security agenda, the Futenma base controversy and other issues in “The U.S.-Japan Alliance” an updated report coauthored with Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asia Affairs, Congressional Research Service) and published December 12, 2013.

 

Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was interviewed about Vice President Biden’s trip to Asia on CCTV America December 1, 2013.

 

In “Japan Chair Platform:  A Chance for Allies to Focus on Alliance Issues,” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website October 1, 2013, Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) writes that, given serious security issues in Northeast Asia, it is imperative that U.S. officials’ meetings in Seoul and Tokyo this week be “used to strengthen the separate alliances rather than discuss tertiary issues regarding territorial disputes or history.”

 

Cohort II scholar Kenji Kushida (Research Associate, Stanford University) commented on the Japanese government’s plan to build an ice wall around the Fukushima nuclear plant in a September 3, 2013 discussion on the PBS Newshour.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) commented on growing distrust of China in an August 27, 2013 article in Asia Pacific Defense Forum.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies)commented on the Senkaku Islands situation in an August 23, 2013  interview with the Asia Pacific Defense Forum.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies), contributed to a report on the possibilities and challenges of U.S.-Japan-Australia cooperation in international disaster relief in the Asia-Pacific region.  The report was a joint project of APCSS, the Association for Cooperation between Japan, U.S. and Australia (ACJUA), and Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

 

In a June 9, 2013 article in The Diplomat, U.S.-Japan Network for the Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Institute of Foreign Policy Analysis) compares President Obama’s June 7-8 summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping to recent bilateral meetings with his Japanese counterparts. Click here to read the article.

 

In a May 22, 2013 article in The National Interest, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described troubled relations between Japan, China and South Korea and suggested a “new approach to regional diplomacy is needed.”  He urged Seoul and Beijing to “take the lead in reaching out to Tokyo even as their disagreements over history and territory continue.” Click here to read the article.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) examined Japan’s North Korea policy in a May 23, 2013 article in World Politics Review. Click here to read the article.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service) examined “North Korea:  U.S. Relations, Nuclear Diplomacy, and Internal Situation” in a recent report co-authored with Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service).

Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth College) wrote about the past and future of the Yasukuni Shrine issue in Japanese politics and East Asia’s foreign relations in “Beware the Tomb of the Known Soldier,”  published in the Spring 2013 edition of Global Asia.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar David Janes (Director, Foundation Grants, and Assistant to the President, United States-Japan Foundation) commented on “Masahiro Sasaki and the Etiquette of Reconciliation” in a March 22 essay in Deliberately Considered.

In a March 15 essay titled “Japan Chair Platform: Assessing the DPJ’s Stewardship of the Alliance,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffery Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) says the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) deserves more credit than it has been given for its handling of the alliance with the United States.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar James Gannon (Executive Director, Japan Center for International Exchange, JCIE) and his JCIE colleagues released the results of their latest survey on U.S. donations in response to Japan’s March 2011 “triple disaster.”  The report released two years since the tragedy estimates that Americans have donated more than $712 million for disaster relief and recovery efforts in Japan, a record amount for a disaster in a developed nation.

Japanese and U.S. goals for the February 22 meeting between Prime Minister Abe and President Obama were among the topics U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) discussed in an interview published by Dispatch Japan February 18.

Network for the Future Scholar Mary Alice Haddad (Cohort I) was interviewed on “Environmental Politics in Northeast Asia: Lessons Learned for North America” by Lynann Butkiewicz at the National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR). A transcript of the interview on February 15 is available here.

In “Japan Chair Platform:  The LDP Rises Again,” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website February 13, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Robert Pekkanen (Associate Professor, University of Washington) examines the LDP’s December electoral victory and what lies ahead for the party.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor, Dartmouth College) analyzes the latest North Korean nuclear test in “Pyongyang’s Nuclear Logic,” published in Foreign Affairs on February 14, 2013.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) writes that China and Japan need rules regulating the interaction of their vessels and aircraft to reduce the possibility of conflict in the East China Sea. His commentary was published in The National Interest on February 11, 2013.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Mireya Solis (Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies, Senior Fellow, Center for Northeast Asia Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution and Associate Professor, American University) examines four major trade initiatives Japan could potentially negotiate this year in “Japan’s Trade Policy in 2013: Possibilities and Pitfalls,” published February 1, 2013.

Network for the Future Scholars Andrew Oros (Washington College) and Weston Konishi (Institute of Foreign Policy Analysis) and U.S.-Korea Scholar-Policymaker Nexus Senior Advisor David Kang contributed to a recent NBR Asia Policy Book Review of Jing Sun’s “Japan and China’s Charm Rivals: Soft Power and Regional Diplomacy.”

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor, Dartmouth College) says that denying Japan’s past obscures “…not only the huge distinctions between the Japan of old and the Japan of today but also the distinctions between it and its contemporary rivals.” Her op-ed was published in the Washington Post on January 25, 2013.

Japan as a Consequential Power. U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described Japan’s continued strategic importance in security and diplomatic spheres in a recent contribution to Is “Japan in Decline?,” a series assessing Japan’s future on the Council for Foreign Relations’ Asia Unbound blog.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Kay Shimuzu (Assistant Professor of Political Science, Columbia University) examined the content and implications of Prime Minister Abe’s economic plans in “2013, Year of Japan’s Revival? Abenomics and the Politics of Growth,” in the January 17 edition of Japan Chair Platform published by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

In an op-ed published in the online version of the New York Times January 1, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Mary McCarthy (Assistant Professor, Drake University) frames the comfort women issue as an opportunity for Japan to lead on human rights. Click here to read the article.

The results of Japan’s December 16 election reflect a rejection of the other parties rather than support for the LDP, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) commented in a December 20 CNN article, “LDP won a landslide, but not a mandate.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Kenneth McElwain (University of Michigan) explains how voter disenchantment produced the LDP’s victory in “Japan’s Disappointment Election,” a December 19 article in the web magazine Deliberately Considered.  Click here to read the article.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Robert Pekkanen (University of Washington) explained how a weak and divided opposition led to an LDP victory in December 18 commentary for the National Bureau of Asian Research,  “The 2012 Japanese Election Paradox: How the LDP Lost Voters and Won the Election.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Weston Konishi (Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis) commented on how U.S. policymakers view the LDP’s December 16 victory in an interview with AFP published December 17.  Read it here.

Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung has written an article “Increasing Security Awareness Among the Japanese Public”on the CSIS Japan Chair Platform (December 13, 2012).  Jeffrey Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) in Honolulu, HI and concurrently holds the position of Adjunct Fellow with the Office of the Japan Chair at CSIS in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Ezra Vogel’s op-ed, “Why Japanese Life is Good,” was published in the Washington Post on December 16, 2012.  Dr. Vogel is the Henry Ford II Research Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus for the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University and on the advisory committee for the Network for the Future program.

Network for the Future Cohort II scholar David Janes contributed a December 7 guest post “Japan, Beyond Tomorrow” on Asia Unbound. This is one of a series of posts on the topic “Is Japan in Decline?” David Janes is the director of foundation grants and assistant to the president of the United States – Japan Foundation.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar David Janes invites statements, suggestions, and stories on how non-governmental organizations have played a role in de-escalating conflict and promoting peaceful reconciliation. Read his December 5th article, “Putting World War II to “Rest?” Opening a Dialogue about Northeast Asia” on Deliberately Considered.  David Janes is the director of foundation grants and assistant to the president of the United States – Japan Foundation.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Dr. Daniel Aldrich was interviewed by Radio New Zealand on Japan’s anti-nuclear movement. The program, called ‘Japan’s Nuclear Rethink,’ was aired on December 3rd 2012 and can be found here. Dr. Aldrich is an associate professor of political science at Purdue University currently living in Japan as a Fulbright research fellow at the University of Tokyo.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Annika Culver’s (Assistant Professor, University of North Caroline at Pembroke) review of Remote Homeland, Recovered Borderland: Manchus, Manchoukuo, and Manchuria, 1907-1985 by Shao Dan was published on H-Net (Humanities & Social Sciences Online) in October.  To read the review, click here.

Dr. Culver also participated in an October 12-14, 2012 panel on “Women, Politics, and the New and Old Proletarian Literature,” at the 21st Annual Association for Japanese Literary Studies Conference at Ohio State University.  An abstract of her paper on “Japanese Women and Rural Settlement in Wartime Manchukuo: Gendered Expressions of Labor and Productivity in Manshu Gurafu [Manchuria Graph], 1940-1944” is available here.

Jeffrey W. Hornung, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar, has written an article on a potential Abe administration in Japan. The article was featured on CNN World on December 3rd 2012. Jeffrey W. Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu and an Adjunct Fellow with the Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. The article, ‘Back to the future in Japan,’ can be viewed here.

Dr. Daniel Aldrich, Network for the Future Cohort I participant and associate professor of political science at Purdue University, will participate in the UNU-ISP Symposium – Rebuilding after 3/11: Vulnerability and Empowerment at the UN University Headquarters in Tokyo on November 30th. He will be speaking on the topic of ‘Social Capital’s Role in Building Resilience’.

Mireya Solis, Network for the Future Cohort I participant, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and associate professor at American University, was quoted in an article in the Washington Post, published November 19th. The article,On Asia trip, Obama presses economic counter to China,’ can be viewed here.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Llewelyn Hughes participated in “Made in Japan: A Showcase of Solutions for Climate Change,” a panel discussion broadcast November 15, 2012, as part of The Climate Reality Project’s “24 Hours of Reality.”  To view the discussion, click here. [http://climaterealityproject.org/24hours2012/live-broadcast/hour-11-japan-south-korea/]

Network for the Future Cohort I and II participants Phillip Lipscy and Kenji Kushida, respectively, wrote an opinion piece, “Protecting Nuclear Plants From Nature’s Worst”, which was published in the Washington Post on October 31, 2012.  To read the article, please click here.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Weston Konishi (Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, IFPA) is co-editor of a recently released report on “U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach.” The report, co-edited by Hoshino Toshiya (Dean, Osaka School of International Public Policy at Osaka University) is the result of a two-year IFPA research and dialogue project aimed in part at helping narrow strategy gaps between the U.S. and Japan in the area of peacebuilding in post-conflict or highly vulnerable countries.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Andrew Oros (Associate Professor, Washington College) discussed his work on Japan-China relations in two China Net TV programs this week.   Click here to listen to his October 21 comments on CCT’V's World Insight program and here to listen to his October 22 comments on CCTV’s Dialogue program.

Network for the Future Cohort II participant Jeffrey Hornung has contributed a chapter on Japan and the Asia-Pacific in “From APEC 2011 to APEC 2012: American and Russian Perspectives on Asia-Pacific Security and Cooperation,” a publication produced jointly by the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and the Far Eastern Federal University. Dr. Hornung’s chapter examines Japan’s economic and security challenges and the policies Japan is prioritizing to address these challenges.

Dangerous Waters Network for the Future Cohort I participant Phillip Lipscy participated in a live debate on September 19, 2012, on France 24, the government-owned international news channel of France.  Dr. Lipscy is assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and the Thomas Rohlen center fellow at the Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center.

U.S., China file dueling complaints as trade tensions heat up Network for the Future Cohort I participant Phillip Lipscy was interviewed by the Los Angeles Times on September 18, 2012.  Dr. Lipscy is assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and the Thomas Rohlen center fellow at the Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center.

Immigration and Citizenship in Japan by U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant Erin Chung, was recently published in Japanese. Dr. Chung is the Charles D. Miller associate professor of East Asian politics at Johns Hopkins University. For information about the Japanese translation of her first book, please click here.

Erin Chung, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Charles D. Miller associate professor of East Asian politics at Johns Hopkins University, has coauthored an article on “Citizenship and Marriage in a Globalizing World: Multicultural Families and Monocultural National Laws in Korea and Japan.” The article will be published in the Winter 2012 issue of the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Please click here to read an abstract.

PacNet #47R – Responses to PacNet #47-  Korea-Japan: Time for Outside Mediation? Weston S. Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.  He has co-authored a response with Carole Shaw to an article: PacNet#47 -Korea-Japan: Time for Outside Mediation? PacNet is a weekly publication generated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).  His response was published on September 6th, 2012.

Jennifer Lind, assistant professor at the Department of Government, Dartmouth College, and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed in Korea Kontext, a podcast of the Korea Economic Institute.  The interview covered Dr. Lind’s opinion on the DPRK government’s resilience and if Kim Jong-un will be able to make substantial reforms.  Listen to the interview on the KEI website.

KEI also posted a Q&A with Dr. Lind on their blog The Peninsula concerning apologies in Northeast Asia.  The post was published on August 30, 2012.  Read it here

South Korea’s Irresponsible Diplomacy With Japan Jeffrey Hornung is Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant. His article was published in The Diplomat on September 4th, 2012.

Japan’s Possible Entry Into the Trans-Pacific Partnership and Its Implications Mark Manyin, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant and Specialist in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service, has authored a new report with his colleague William Cooper (Specialist in International Trade and Finance). It was published on August 24, 2012.

Weston Konishi was interviewed by Mainichi Shimbun and it was published on August 19, 2012. Weston Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.  In the interview, Weston argues that Japan’s territorial issues have to be seen in the context of its ongoing historical disputes, which complicate a diplomatic solution to the crises. A more consistent approach toward resolving historical disputes would place Japan in a stronger position to confront its territorial disputes with its neighbors.  A copy of the article in Japanese may be found here.

Emma Chanlett-Avery, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Specialist in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service, has authored a new report with her colleague Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service). The August 3, 2012 report, ”The U.S. Military Presence in Okinawa and the Futenma Base Controversy,” examines the current status of the base relocation agreement as well as the strategic, historic and political context for the U.S. military presence in Okinawa. To read the report, please click here.

Andrew Oros, Network for the Future Fellow and Associate Professor, Washington College, has written a book review of Claude Meyer’s new Columbia University Press book, China or Japan: Which Will Lead Asia?  Read the review here.

Andrew Oros was interview on NPR/WBEZ’s Worldview radio program on August 21 about the Senkaku dispute and broader issues between Japan and China. Find the program here. Andrew Oros is a Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Associate Professor at Washington College.

Better Public Diplomacy in East Asia Weston S. Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future. A commentary he coauthored with Greer Meisels on US and its allies in Asia was published in The National Interest on August 14, 2012.

Thinking through Japan-ROK security relations Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant. He co-authored the article which was published in The Japan Times on August 1, 2012.

Why China Should Do More In Afghanistan Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Diplomat on August 1, 2012.

Jeffrey Hornung,  Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant, was quoted in Japan-South Korea Relations: Time to Open Both Eyes, an article by Ralph A. Cossa, President, Pacific Forum CSIS.  The article is published by the Council on Foreign Relations.

Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, quoted in Nuclear: Report blames Fukushima disaster on top levels of utilities, regulators, by Nathanael Massey, published in ClimateWire, July 6, 2012.

Lost Chance for Tokyo-Seoul Security Relations Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Japan Times  on June 18, 2012.

Japan’s Sensible New Defense Chief Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His op-ed was published in The Diplomat on June 16, 2012.

Hard lessons for U.S. Nuclear Safety from Fukushima Meltdown Daniel Aldrich is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  His op-ed on lessons learned from Fukushima was posted on CNN May 25, 2012.

Okinawa and the Future of the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, discusses the U.S. military presence in Okinawa in an interview published by the National Bureau of Asian Research May 11, 2012.

From Rhetoric to Reality: Foreign-Policy Making under the Democratic Party of Japan, Weston Konishi, Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant, examines the Democratic Party of Japan’s foreign-policy making since 2009.  This report was published by the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis in April 2012.

Japan PM in U.S. to Turn Page for Alliance Weston Konishi, Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, was interviewed by Agence France-Presse for an article about Prime Minister Noda’s Washington visit and the agreement on U.S. troop realignment. The article appeared in the Bangkok Post April 30, 2012.

U.S.-Japan Summit Meeting Nicholas Szechenyi is a senior fellow and deputy director of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.  He is also a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  This was published on the CSIS publications page on April 25, 2012.

Op-Ed: North Korea Gets Too Many Second Chances Jennifer Lind is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  She was interviewed by Neil Conan on his NPR radio show, Talk of the Nation, on April 16, 2012.

Why North Korea Gets Away With It Jennifer Lind is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  Her article was published in Foreign Affairs on April 12, 2012.

Noda has an SDF moment Jeffrey Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Japan Times  on April 7, 2012.

How the F-35 May Hurt U.S.-Japan Ties Jeffery Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Diplomat on April 5, 2012.

Aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed by Voice of Russia on March 15, 2012.

Building Democracy in Japan Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor at Wesleyan University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant, examines the democratic transition in Japan and the road that led to the transformation of the nation’s political culture. The book was published in 2012 by Cambridge University Press.

One Year Later: Rebuilding After the Great Tohoku Earthquake James Gannon, a participant in Cohort I of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, was interviewed in PhilanTopic about progress rebuilding in the Tohoku region.  The article was published March 9, 2012.

What Japan Must Do Now by Jeffrey Hornung, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. The article, published in The Diplomat on March 10, 2012, reviews the current state of affairs in Japan one year after the devastating earthquake and emphasizes the importance of political decisions in the wake of disaster.

Fukushima One Year Later  Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed by Laura Araki of the National Bureau of Asian Research on March 6, 2012, concerning the lasting impact of the March 11 earthquake in Japan and the continuing recovery efforts. Read the full interview on the National Bureau of Asian Research website.

Japan’s Nuclear Disaster Inspires Civil Society to Act, Engage. Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant, comments on changes in civil society following the 2011 earthquake and nuclear reactor tragedy in Japan. The article was released on March 1, 2012.

Learning to Share the Stage by Jennifer Lind, assistant professor of government at Dartmouth College and  U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Published by The New York Times on February 5, 2012.

Kathryn Ibata-Arens, a participant in Cohort I of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, is among the members of a “U.S.-Japan Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council” launched in Tokyo January 25, 2012. The U.S. Department of State and Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry launched the Council as part of the U.S.-Japan Dialogue to Promote Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Job Creation. Read the U.S. Embassy press release here (Japanese here).

Japan Moves Forward: Views from the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future  This publication compiles policy papers from each of the fifteen participants in the inaugural group of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.

Japan Chair Platform: Time to Acknowledge the Realignment Impasse by Jeffrey W. Hornung, U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.

US-Japan Cooperation on the Reform of International Organizations by Philip Lipscy, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.   This working paper is part of the Japan Center for International Exchange  new study on “An Enhanced Agenda for US-Japan Partnership.”

A New Framework for US-Japan Development Cooperation by James Gannon, Executive Director, JCIE/USA, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.This working paper is part of the Japan Center for International Exchange  new study on “An Enhanced Agenda for US-Japan Partnership.”

Japan’s Sputnik Moment by Dr. Kathryn Ibata-Arens, an associate professor at DePaul University, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  This paper will be part of a complination of policy papers published and presented at a January 2012 public symposium in Washington, D.C.

“Tepco ‘Deal With Devil’ Signals End to Japan’s Postwar Era” New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Published by Bloomberg News on October 21, 2011.

“Resource Nationalism in the Asia-Pacific: Why Does It Matter?” New commentary by Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor, George Washington University, and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Appears in the  National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) Energy Security Report, “Asia’s Rising Energy and Resource Nationalism,” published September 2011.

“Neighbors connecting in disasters”. New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Published in The Baltimore Sun on August 26, 2011.

“Make nice with your neighbors: they’re the key to surviving a disaster”.  New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Aired on 89.3  KCPP Southern California Public Radio on August 25, 2011.

“Nuclear Power’s Future in Japan and Abroad: The Fukushima Accident in Social and Political Perspective”.  Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Published in ParisTech Review on August 25, 2011.


“POINT OF VIEW/ Daniel P. Aldrich and Mika Shimizu: Smaller is better — Private and individual philanthropy after the 3/11 disaster.”
Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, August 9, 2011.

Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow interviewed in “The Future of Nuclear Energy in japan.” by Chris Acheson, published in the National Bureau of Asian Research, August 1, 2011.

“The Role of Communities in Post-Disaster Recovery.” Video commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S. – Japan network for the Future Fellow, published by the U.S. Department of State’s Media Hub in Japan, on YouTube, July, 2011.

“After a half century of unwavering support, Japan should become free, says prime minister.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in WBEZ91.5, July 29, 2011.

“Contribute to renewal not just recovery.” Commentary by Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor, Wesleyan University,  Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, July 15, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “The Key to Disaster Survival? Friends and Neighbors” by Shankar Vedantam, published in National Public Radio, July 4, 2011.

“Future Fission: Why Japan Won’t Abandon Nuclear Power.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Global Asia, June, 2011.

“The Tohoku Disaster: Crisis ‘Windows,’ Complexity, and Social Capital.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Items & Issues, The Social Science Research Council, June, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “In Japan, a Culture That Promotes Nuclear Dependency” by Martin Fackler and Norimitsu Onishi, published in The New York Times , May 30, 2011.

“A crisis silver lining: Volunteerism, smarter building and open debate.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, May 05, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in ”Disasters strike; Purdue experts have been busy by Eric Weddle,” published in the Journal & Courier Online, April 20, 2011

“Implications of Japan’s nuclear crisis for Korea”, Article by Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow and Mi-kyoung Kim, published in the Korea Times, April 17, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “McDonald’s Wage for Nuclear Job Shows Japan Towns May Fade” by John Brinsley and Aki Ito, published in the Bloomberg Business and Financial News, April 10, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “Purdue professor shares disaster, nuclear expertise” by Eric Weddle, published in the Journal & Courier Online, April 1, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in ”Public Anger Against Nuclear Power Mounts In Japan” by Anthony Kuhn, published in National Public Radio, March 31, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed in “Nuclear power shouldn’t be ignored” by Chris Flynn, published in The Exponent Online, March 31, 2011

Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow interviewed on The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell(Video) published by MSNBC, March 22, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in Fukushima, Indian Point and Fantasy by Peter Applebome, published in the New York Times, March 20, 2011

With a Mighty Hand: The Japanese government’s influential and manipulative role in commercial nuclear power,” article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in The New Republic, March 19, 2011.

Readiness Mitigates Japan’s Earthquake Aftermath,” Commentary by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor, Wesleyan University, Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the The Hartford Courant, March 19, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in ‘Too Late’ for Some Tsunami Victims to Rebuild in Japan by Michael Wines, published in the New York Times, March 19, 2011.

Where We Live: Japan, One Week Later: What CT residents are doing and can do to help,” (Audio) Interview by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor, Wesleyan University, Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Your Public Media’s Where We Live, March 18, 2011.

The Economic Impact of Japan’s Earthquake,” Interview featuring Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Japan Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies from The Diane Rehm Show, published by WAMU 88.5. March 16, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed in Japan Disaster Global Impact (Video), published by CNBC, March 15, 2011.

“Purdue Political Science Professor Daniel Aldrich assesses the current state of Japan in the terrible earthquake and tsunami aftermath,” Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed by Denis Prior, WSBT News Radio, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Purdue professor weighs in on partial nuclear meltdown in Japan,” by Alisha Yadav, published in the Purdue Exponent, ‎March 14, 2011‎

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Stricken Japan Reactor Just Passed Probe for Next Decade,” by Jason Clenfield and Yuriy Hember, Published in Bloomberg Businessweek, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Special Edition of Our World” by SarahWilliams, published in Voice of America Radio, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “IAEA: No Indication of Nuclear Reactor Meltdown in Japan,” by JulieAnn McKellogg, published in Voice of America, March 14, 2011.

Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Associate Professor, DePaul University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “JA Delegation Safe After Massive Temblor,” by Gwen Muranaka, published inRafu Shimpo – Los Angeles Japanese Daily News, March 11, 2011.

ABC7 talks to Chicago prof in Japan as aftershock hits,” Interview with Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Associate Professor, DePaul University, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published by ABC7 News, WLS-TV Chicago, IL, March 11, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, Interview, background for Dan McFeely, “Indiana Schools track safety of students in Japan,” Indianapolis Star 11 March 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed for “Professor: quake like atomic weapons,” by Tiffanie Dismore, published in WLFI 18 News Program, March 11, 2011.

“Preparing for North Korean Collapse,” Commentary by  Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, December 17, 2010.

“G-20 puts Asia in limelight, but Japan in the dark,” Commentary by Mireya Solis, Assistant Professor, American University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, December 8, 2010. (Japanese)

“Reinvigorating U.S.-Japan Policy Dialogue and Study,” Report drafted by James Gannon, Executive Director, Japan Center for International Exchange (JCIE/USA) and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, December 2010.

“Can the U.S. and Japan Finally Reconcile Over Hiroshima?” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Atlantic, November 12, 2010.

“Last Stop: Yokohama,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, November 2, 2010.

“The Once and Future Kim,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Foreign Affairs, October 25, 2010.

“The Power of People: Social Capital and Post-Disaster Recovery,” Article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at the Global Policy Research Institute.

“A Glimmer of Success,” Article by Matthew D. Marr, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Florida International University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Miami Herald, October 8, 2010.

“Resolve Okinawa Base Dispute? Yes, You, Kan,” Article by Ken Haig, Assistant Professor of Political Studies, Bard College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, September 13, 2010.

“Apology Diplomacy at Hiroshima,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Atlantic, August 13, 2010.

“Symbolic Gestures: Lessons for East Asia from a Compromise on History in America,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Global Asia, Summer 2010

“U.S. Nuclear Renaissance or Still Muddling Through?” Article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, June 2, 2010.

“Political Turmoil in Japan,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, June 2, 2010

“U.S.-Japan: A Step Closer to Resolving the Impasse over Futenma,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, May 25, 2010

“Virginia’s Lessons for East Asia’s ‘History Problems,’” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, May 6, 2010

“A New Era of Japanese Foreign Policy,” Article by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor of Government at Wesleyan University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, March 30, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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