Network Commentary

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort IV scholar Adam Liff (Indiana University) examines the prospects for constitutional revision following Japan’s July 10 Upper House election in “On the verge of history? Japan’s 2016 election and prospects for Article 9 revision,” published in the July 11, 2016 PacNet newsletter.

In a recent article in the East Asia Forum, Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Johns Hopkins University) outlines why, despite the growing importance of Japan’s humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR) operations in the Asia-Pacific, HADR “is unlikely to be a springboard for a more active Japanese security policy overall.”  Mr. Konishi’s article, “Is disaster relief revolutionising Japan’s security affairs?,” was published July 6, 2016.

Last week U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Johns Hopkins University) gave a presentation in Tokyo on maritime security mechanisms in the Asia-Pacific.  The presentation was part of a joint PacificForum CSIS/Tokyo Foundation workshop on “The U.S.-Japan Alliance as a Regional Problem-solving Mechanism.”  Asked to suggest ways the U.S.-Japan alliance can include China and the Republic of Korea in providing maritime security, Mr. Konishi argued for “building up before building out” cooperation with China. Mr. Konishi suggested institutionalizing maritime mechanisms where U.S.-Japan alliance interests overlap with China’s interests — such as protecting sea lanes of communication — rather than seeking to broaden cooperation in areas that are unlikely to get substantial support from Beijing.

Cohort I scholar Kenneth Haig, who serves as co-chair of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (ACCJ) Energy Committee, explained why the committee has encouraged Japan to “adopt market mechanisms promoting investment in demand-side as well as supply-side energy resources” in the July issue of the ACCJ’s Journal.

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa USA) commented on reports that Chinese Navy warships have shadowed U.S. Navy ships in the Asia-Pacific in “China shadows U.S. warships amid rising tensions in Asia,” published in USA TODAY on June 15, 2016.

Five Cohort III scholars also presented their perspectives on key issues facing Japan — including long working hours, religion in politics, and upcoming elections — at a June 9, 2016 Capitol Hill symposium moderated by Network Advisory Committee member Ezra Vogel (Harvard University).  The speakers included Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University), Emer O’Dwyer (Oberlin College), Liv Coleman (University of Tampa), Daniel Smith (Harvard University), and Michael Strausz (Texas Christian University).  Their remarks reflected research topics they addressed in policy papers prepared as part of the Network program.  Policy papers by all thirteen Cohort III scholars were compiled in “New Perspectives on Japan from the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future,” available on the Foundation’s website. The fourteen essays in this publication consider such challenges for Japan as: building consensus on constitutional and national security questions, ensuring economic growth, and adjusting the U.S.-Japan alliance to meet new security challenges.  The authors also suggest opportunities for Japan to advance agriculture and immigration reform, pioneer innovative solutions to workplace issues, and contribute to world politics.

Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery (Congressional Research Service) in May 2016, received the Kato Prize, which was created in 2008 to honor the career and spirit of Ryozo Kato, Japan’s ambassador to the United States from 2001-2008.  Each year a group of five Washington think tanks (the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Center for a New American Security, the Brookings Institution, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Stimson Center) awards the prize to individuals who have shown a deep commitment to strengthening the U.S.-Japan alliance.  Ms. Chanlett-Avery’s recent work on U.S.-Japan relations includes an April 21 Congressional Research Service “In Focus” piece outlining the politics and potential ramifications of President Obama’s visit to Hiroshima later this month.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa USA) analyzed Prime Minister Abe’s efforts to resolve territorial disputes with Russia in “Why Has Japan Been Cozying Up to Vladimir Putin?” published in Newsweek May 25, 2016.  Dr. Hornung also commented on China’s large Coast Guard vessels in “In the East China Sea, Beijing’s Big Ships Push the Envelope,” published on Foreignpolicy.com May 22, 2016.

Several U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars commented on this week’s White House announcement that President Obama will visit Hiroshima after the G-7 Summit.  In a May 11, 2016 Washington Post article Andrew Oros (Washington College) commented that, while many Japanese disagree on aspects of U.S. policy, “they will be happy about the symbolism of a U.S. president making some nod to the victimization of everyday Japanese people. And they expect he will renew a commitment to a nuclear-free world, which has been the cornerstone of Japanese foreign policy for the whole post-war period.”

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) also discussed the implications of the Hiroshima visit in a May 10, 2016 interview on National Public Radio.

Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Johns Hopkins University) characterized the upcoming visit as a positive step that will be broadly accepted and welcomed by the Japanese people in an interview with BBC World Service radio. Please click here to listen to the interview, which follows other news stories.

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa USA) and Mike Mochizuki (George Washington University) co-authored “Japan:  Still an Exceptional U.S. Ally,” published in The Washington Quarterly April 29, 2016.  The article assesses four dimensions of Japan’s defense policy and, for each dimension, compares Japan to seven other U.S. allies. Dr. Hornung’s other recent publications include an April 28, 2016 Wall Street Journal op-ed about Japan’s failed bid to sell submarines to Australia and an April 27, 2016 Sankei Shimbun article on President Obama’s possible visit to Hiroshima.  Please click here to read an English summary of the Sankei Shimbun article and here to read the full article in Japanese

In “Make Japan Democratic Again,” published on ForeignPolicy.com April 22, 2016, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) outlines how Japan’s new Democratic Party (DP) can compete with the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and why this is important for Japan.  He notes that “without a realistic threat to be unseated by an opposition party, the LDP could shrink from hard choices instead of implementing creative policies – like permitting more immigrants, for example, or fundamentally rethinking the tax system – that would help Japan cope with its long-term economic and demographic challenges.”

Cohort I Scholar Mirey Solis (Brookings Institution) examined “The High Stakes of TPP Ratification:  Implications for Asia-Pacific and Beyond,” in an article published in the March/April 2016 issue of Economy, Culture & History Japan SPOTLIGHT Bimonthly.

Cohort I Scholar Daniel Aldrich (Northeastern University) addressed “Anti-Nuclear Sentiment and Japan’s Energy Choices” on the Council on Foreign Relations Asia Unbound blog the week of April 14, 2016.

“Religious Responses to the 2011 Tsunami in Japan,” an article by Cohort III scholar Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University) was published the week of April 14, 2016 by Oxford Handbooks Online and is available to subscribers here.

Commentary from Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation) was featured in a full-page piece in the Ronten section of Mainichi newspaper on April 12, 2016. In his remarks, Dr. Hornung emphasized that Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit to Hiroshima, the highest sitting U.S. official to make that pilgrimage, was a reflection of the current strength of the U.S.-Japan relationship.  The piece also features commentary from Yasushi Akashi, Chairman of the International House of Japan, a strategic partner of the Foundation and home to the Foundation’s Tokyo office.  Please click here to read the article in Japanese.

As the White House reportedly weighs whether President Obama should visit Hiroshima during his trip to Japan next month, Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) writes such a visit “would be a complex and controversial journey.” Her analysis, “The Presidential Path to Hiroshima:  An Obama Apology to Japan?” was posted on the Foreign Affairs website on April 8, 2016.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) was quoted in an April 3, 2016 Japan Times article on President Obama’s meeting with President Park Geun-hye and Prime Minister Abe on the sidelines of last week’s Nuclear Security Summit.

Network for the Future scholars Tobias Harris and Jeffrey Hornung (both with Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) were quoted in “Trump’s Japan-bashing has close U.S. ally in Asia on edge,” published in USA TODAY March 17, 2016.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) contributed a chapter to “Sustainable Security:  Rethinking American National Security Strategy.”  In “Keep, Toss, or Fix?  Assessing U.S. Alliances in East Asia,” Dr. Lind states that, although keeping U.S. alliances in East Asia “makes sense under the current grand strategy, Washington should ‘fix’ them in a few key ways, to maximize the utility of those alliances, and to reduce their costs and risks.”

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) and Sasakawa USA Chairman Dennis co-authored “China’s self-defeating provocations in the South China Sea,” published in the Washington Post March 2, 2016.

In “Trump Shouldn’t Bash Japan,” Network for the Future scholars Tobias Harris and Jeffrey Hornung (both with Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) write that Donald Trump’s Japan-bashing “is unjustified by the facts, and if realized…would do little more than disrupt a critical U.S. relationship in a critical region at a critical moment.” The article was published in The National Interest  February 25, 2016.

In “Japan’s Security Evolution,” a new paper for the Cato Institute, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) writes that Japan’s recent security reforms “represent continuity, rather than change, in a pattern in which Japan relies upon the United States for its security but contributes more to the alliance when its security environment worsens.”   “From Washington’s standpoint,” Dr. Lind adds, “Japan’s greater activism and burden-sharing within the alliance is welcome news.”

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Scholars Emma Chanlett-Avery and Ian Rinehart, both with the Congressional Research Service (CRS), have co-authored a new CRS report on the U.S.-Japan alliance.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar James Gannon (Japan Center for International Exchange) co-edited “Looking for Leadership:  The Dilemma of Political Leadership in Japan,” a new publication from the Japan Center for International Exchange.  In the volume’s concluding chapter, Mr. Gannon and co-editor Ryo Sahashi (Kanagawa University) examine the implications of the authors’ argument that “without further changes to the political system, powerful institutional factors will continue to make it difficult for prime ministers to exercise political leadership in a sustained and effective manner.”

In an article posted on the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog January 13, 2016, Cohort II scholar Celeste Arrington (George Washington University) writes that excluding the victims and their supporters from negotiations that led to the agreement “will make it harder for the Korean government to implement the deal, because the movement rejects the agreement.”  She adds that “the movement’s political leverage did not disappear” when the agreement was announced, concluding “It has the power to refuse to go along.”

In “Testing the Japan-Korea Relationship,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars Tobias Harris and Jeffrey Hornung, both with Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, examine the prospects and importance of the agreement Japan and South Korea reached on the “comfort women” issue last month. They note “the trust required to make this agreement stick is in short supply.  Politicians, journalists and activists in both countries…will pounce on any sign that the other side isn’t living up to its commitments.”  The article was published in the Wall Street Journal January 12, 2016.

Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) considers Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s 2015 successes and setbacks in “Abe cements power as opposition nowhere to be seen,” published in the East Asia Forum December 22, 2015.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin (Congressional Research Service) explores options for U.S. intervention in “Managing Japan-South Korea Tensions,” a Council on Foreign Relations Discussion Paper released last December.  Mr. Manyin argues that, although “more forceful intervention in Japan-South Korea relations carries risks to the United States, the costs of nonintervention are rising.”

In a December 2, 2015 op-ed published in the Mainichi U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Advisory Committee member Leonard Schoppa (University of Virginia) called Prime Minister Abe’s decision not to accept any Syrian refugees “very disappointing.”  Professor Schoppa described some of the ways refugees have enriched his community, and said Prime Minister Abe “does not understand that the refugees Japan helps today will someday help Japan change and become a better place, like my Southern town.”

Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) considers whether Abenomics has lived up to its promise in “Abe’s Last Shot for Action on Economic Growth,” originally published in the Wall Street Journal Asia edition November 19, 2015.

A new report authored by Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) “examines the political and military structures the U.S. shares with other alliances as a prism through which to consider ways to improve the U.S.-Japan alliance.”  The report, “Modeling a Stronger U.S.-Japan Alliance,” concludes with recommendations on ways to improve U.S.-Japan alliance structures.  It was published last November in collaboration with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Advisory Committee member Ezra Vogel (Harvard University) discussed China’s changing relations with Japan and Taiwan in an interview posted November 12, 2015 on Sinosphere, the New York Times’ China blog.

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) and co-author Paul Midford (Norwegian University for Science and Technology) examined Japan’s refugee assistance and asylum policy in “Opening Japan’s Doors to Refugees,”  published in the Wall Street Journal November 3, 2015.  The authors wrote “If Japan wants to play the more proactive role in international security that Mr. Abe has argued for, then Tokyo needs to take a different approach to today’s refugee crisis.”

Cohort II scholar Gene Park (Loyola Marymount University) was quoted in a November 3, 2015 New York Times article on the privatization of Japan Post.

In a two-part series published October 27, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, SPFUSA) reviewed Japan’s international contributions under Prime Minister Abe and opportunities for Japan to be more proactive.   “Gauging Japan’s Proactive Contributions to Peace,” (Part One)  was published in The Diplomat and “Boosting Japan’s Proactive Contributions to Peace” (Part Two) was posted on  the SPFUSA website.

Also on October 27, Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) outlined “The Next Steps for Japan on the Road to the Trans-Pacific Partnership,” in an article posted on the SPFUSA website.

In an October 2015, article in the Asia-Pacific Journal, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University) examined “Komeito’s Soka Gakkai Protestors and Supporters: Religious Motivations for Political Activism in Contemporary Japan.”

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Mary McCarthy (Drake University) was interviewed about “comfort women” memorials in the United States for the public affairs program “Which Way, LA?” with Warren Olney.  The September 24, 2015 episode focused on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ recent decision to erect a “comfort women” memorial in San Francisco.  Dr. McCarthy discussed reaction in Japan to these memorials in the United States, noting that they are becoming part of the Japanese domestic debate over the “comfort women” issue.   Please click here to listen to the episode from public radio station KCRW in Santa Monica.

In “Abe on His Heels: The Prime Minister’s Domestic Standing after the Security Reforms,” published on  ForeignAffairs.com, Cohort I scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA) writes that deliberations over Prime Minister Abe’s security legislation “have politicized security-related issues and severely depleted the political capital of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.”  Dr. Hornung also was interviewed for a September 18, 2015 USA Today article on the potential impact of the new security laws.

In “Another Three Years of Abe,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) looks at challenges that might be ahead for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who recently secured a second term as leader of Japan’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party.  The article was published in the Wall Street Journal September 10.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jeffrey Hornung and Dennis Blair, both with Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, co-authored “Missed opportunities in the Pentagon’s new maritime strategy,” published in the August 31, 2015 PacNet newsletter.  Dr. Hornung and Admiral Blair wrote that the Asia-Pacific Maritime Security Strategy released last month is “sound” and “demonstrates that the military aspect of the rebalance is alive and well,” but concluded “a more comprehensive treatment of the full range of maritime issues would improve U.S. engagement in the region.”

Cohort II scholar Hiroki Takeuchi’s (Southern Methodist University) latest article in the Japanese online journal Foresight, “Security Legislation Process ‘Drifting’: The U.S. Perspective,” was published August 11, 2015.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Daniel Aldrich discussed the implications of Japan’s return to nuclear energy in an interview on CNBC’s “The Rundown” August 9, 2015.  In anticipation of this week’s restart of a nuclear reactor in Sendai, Dr. Aldrich noted it is a “hard sell” to convince people living near nuclear power plants that evacuation plans for disasters like the 2011 Fukushima accident are realistic.

Dr. Aldrich also discussed the political and financial reasons for moving forward with nuclear energy in Japan. His commentary was also featured in a related CNBC article on August 10, 2015. Dr. Aldrich was named Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Co-Director of the Security and Resilience Studies Masters program at Northeastern University earlier this year.

Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) is one of three authors of a new Sasakawa USA report, “Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank: China as Responsible Stakeholder?” The report provides perspectives from Japanese, Chinese, and American authors, with Mr. Harris contributing a chapter on “The U.S. Response to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.”

In Significant Soil: Settler Colonialism and Japan’s Urban Empire in Manchuria, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Emer O’Dwyer outlines the history of Japan’s prewar Manchurian empire over four decades and explains how the process of naturalizing South Manchuria as a Japanese space contributed to the Japanese army’s takeover of Manchuria in the early 1930s.  Please click here for more information about Dr. Dwyer’s new book.

In “Rebooting Japan’s Security Legislation Debate,” Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, SPFUSA) wrote that deliberations on a package of security-related bills that started in the upper house of Japan’s National Diet this week provide opportunities for the government to “do a better job explaining the content and need for the bills” and for critics to “consider the legislation’s provisions beyond the issue of collective self-defense and acknowledge the limits still maintained on the SDF’s [Self-Defense Forces] use of force.”  The article was posted on the SPFUSA website July 28, 2015.

Cohort III scholar Liv Coleman (University of Tampa) discussed Japan’s low birthrate and declining population in a July 21, 2015 interview with NPR affiliate WBEZ.  Dr. Coleman explained population trends in Japan following World War II, reasons for the decades-long decline in births, and recent government policies and corporate practices intended to reverse this decline.

WBEZ interviewed Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) about Prime Minister Abe’s efforts to update Japan’s security policies, including his government’s 2014 move to relax Japan’s ban on arms exports.  Please click here to listen to the July 20, 2015 interview.

Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) considered the historical significance of the legislation in “Japan’s Security Evolution, Not Revolution,” published in the Wall Street Journal July 20, 2015.  Dr. Lind characterized the legislation as “the most recent step in a long evolution for a highly responsible and peaceful country that today faces a growing threat.  And as such it represents more continuity than change in Japan’s national security policy.”

Cohort I scholar Daniel Aldrich (Purdue University) and Cohort III scholar Shihoko Goto (Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars) were among the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars to comment on security legislation passed by the lower house of Japan’s National Diet last week.  The legislation would amend the ways in which the Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF) can operate in order to implement a new interpretation of the constitution that allows the exercise of collective self-defense. In a July 16, 2015 interview on “Here & Now,” Ms. Goto explained the background of Article 9 of Japan’s Constitution, which renounces war, as well as opposition in Japan and the region to expanding the JSDF’s role. In a July 16, 2015 interview on Al Jazeera, Dr. Aldrich also discussed the implications of, and opposition to, the security legislation.

Cohort III Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) considered the implications of Japan’s recent pension system data breach for Prime Minister Abe’s reform plans in “Pensioned Off:  Will Abe Survive the Latest Scandal?” posted on ForeignAffairs.com June 11, 2015.

Cohort I scholar Mary Alice Haddad (Wesleyan University) co-edited NIMBY Is Beautiful: Cases of Local Activism and Environmental Innovation Around the World, published early 2015.  She also contributed the conclusion and a chapter titled “From Backyard Environmental Advocacy to National Democratization: The Cases of South Korea and Taiwan.”

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Hiroki Takeuchi (Southern Methodist University, SMU) completed his three-article series on the implications of Prime Minister Abe’s visit to the U.S. with the publication of “U.S.-Japan Relations in a ‘New Age’ after Abe’s Visit to the U.S. (3): Implications of TPP “Beyond Economics.” The article was published in the Japanese online journal Foresight on June 3, 2015.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Annika Culver (Florida State University, FSU) recently received a Japan Foundation Japanese Studies Research Fellowship to work on the project “For the Birds:  An American Ornithologist’s Interactions with Japanese Scientists and the Environment in U.S.-Occupied Japan, 1946-1950” at Waseda University in Tokyo this August-December.  Dr. Culver’s research project grew out of her work for the Oliver L. Austin, Jr. Photographic Collection at FSU’s Institute on World War II and the Human Experience.  Dr. Culver has led a project to digitize this collection, which recently was made available to the public to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

Cohort III scholar Hiroki Takeuchi (Southern Methodist University, SMU) has written the second article in a three-article series on the implications of Prime Minister Abe’s visit to the U.S.  The article, “U.S.-Japan Relations in a ‘New Age’ after Abe’s Visit to the U.S. (1): Alliance One Step Ahead,” was published in the Japanese online journal Foresight May 23, 2015.

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung’s (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) article “Japan’s Pushback of China,” was published in The Washington Quarterly May 20, 2015.  The article is available to subscribers here.

In “The Abe Government Grapples with Low IT Investment,” published on the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA website May 18, Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) discussed why information technology (IT) is “increasingly critical” to the Abe government’s economic vision and the challenges his government faces in trying to promote greater IT investment.

In his latest article in the Japanese online journal Foresight, Cohort III scholar Hiroki Takeuchi (Southern Methodist University) reviewed Prime Minister Abe’s recent visit to the United States.  The May 14, 2015 article focuses on “U.S.-Japan Relations in a ‘New Age’ after Abe’s Visit to the U.S. (1): How to Manage China?”
U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs), Mark Manyin (Specialist in Asian Affairs), and Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs), all with the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to an updated CRS report on Japan-U.S. Relations:  Issues for Congress published April 23, 2015.

Cohort II scholar Annika Culver (Florida State University, FSU) led a project to digitize the Oliver L. Austin, Jr. Photographic Collection at the Institute on World War II and the Human Experience at FSU, which was made available to the public to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

Cohort III scholar Kiyoteru Tsutsui (University of Michigan) co-edited Corporate Social Responsibility in a Globalizing World, released in April 2015 by Cambridge University Press.

Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was quoted in a May 22, 2015 New York Times article on U.S. Navy surveillance flights over Chinese land reclamation projects in the South China Sea.

Cohort II scholar Mary McCarthy (Drake University) discussed the “comfort women” issue in “Dialogue the key to resolving comfort women history wars,” published in the East Asia Forum May 19, 2015.

Network scholars Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs), Mark Manyin (Specialist in Asian Affairs), and Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs), all with the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to an updated CRS report on Japan-U.S. Relations:  Issues for Congress published April 23, 2015.

In “The Abe Government Grapples with Low IT Investment,” published on the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA website May 18, 2015, Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) discussed why information technology (IT) is “increasingly critical” to the Abe government’s economic vision and the challenges his government faces in trying to promote greater IT investment.

In “Who’s Afraid of the AIIB:  Why the United States Should Support China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank,” posted on Foreign Affairs’ website May 7, 2015, Cohort I scholar Phillip Lipscy (Stanford University) wrote “Both the United States and Japan have far more to gain by joining the AIIB and shaping its future than remaining on the sidelines.”

Cohort I scholar Daniel Aldrich (Purdue University) examined the role of trust and social networks in saving lives during disasters in “The Need for Social Capital:  More Trust Meant Fewer Deaths in Tohoku,” published May 2015 in Oriental Economist.

In “U.S.-Japan:  A Pacific Alliance Transformed,” Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) explained some of the important changes in the revised Guidelines for U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation released April 27, 2015.

Among the Network for the Future scholars to provide their perspectives on Prime Minister Abe’s 2015 visit to Washington were Cohort I scholar Mireya Solis (Brookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies), Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies), and Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence).  In an April 27, 2015 blog post on the Brookings Institution’s website, Dr. Solis predicted, “Done right, this bilateral summit has the potential to effectively leverage a deeper U.S.-Japan partnership to address global challenges in an era of fluid geopolitics and institutional innovation in international economic governance.”  Dr. Hornung focused on Prime Minister Abe’s historic opportunity to address a joint session of Congress in “Japan Chair Platform:  Mr. Abe Goes to Washington,” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website April 22, 2015.  In “Abe is Back, Japan Not So Much,” published on ForeignPolicy.com, Mr. Harris notes that, after a week “celebrating Japan’s resurgence and its importance as an ally of the United States, Abe will return to a people anxious about his plans for his country and an economy that continues to face serious obstacles to growth.”

 

Cohort III scholar Shihoko Goto (Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars) commented on Prime Minister Abe’s 2015 visit to the United States in numerous media appearances and articles.  These included: NPR’s Morning Edition; NPR affiliate KCRW’s “To the Point” with Warren Olney; NPR affiliate KCRW’s “Press Play” with Madeleine Brand together with Rep. Mike Honda; VOA; Deutsche Welle; CCTV; National Journal; AFP;Deutsche Welle; Japan Times; Comments to Bloomberg; Comments to Singapore Straits Times; Op-ed on Abe in California in National Interest

 

 

Cohort II Scholar Gene Park (Loyola Marymount University) and Eisaku Ide co-edited a book that explains patterns of fiscal performance from the 1970s to the present in seven countries, including Japan, Korea and the United States. The book, Deficits and Debt in Industrialized Democracies, includes contributions from an international, interdisciplinary team of scholars.

Cohort I Scholar Daniel Aldrich (Purdue University) was part of an expert committee that produced a May 2015 publication that explores cross-sector coordination in the wake of disasters. Healthy, Resilient, and Sustainable Communities After Disasters analyzes opportunities to improve community resilience and sustainability. The publication is the product of a study initiative led by the Committee on Post-Disaster Recovery of a Community’s Health, Medical, and Social Services.
Cohort I scholar Mireya Solis (Brookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies) was quoted in an April 3, 2015 Standard Examiner article on the status of Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations.

Cohort I scholar Daniel Aldrich (Purdue University) was part of a study team that produced “Elders Leading the Way to Resilience,” a report for the World Bank that describes the experience of Ofunato, Japan after it was devastated by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.  Dr. Aldrich also discussed infrastructure building in the city of Kamaishi in Tohoku, Japan after the 3/11 disaster for an interview with ABC NewsRadio’s Japan in Focus program.

In “Making Up Isn’t Hard to Do,” published March 5, 2015 in Foreign Affairs, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) examines tensions between Japan and South Korea and what it might take to bring the two countries together.
Cohort I scholar James Gannon (Japan Center for International Exchange, JCIE) authored “Strengthening U.S.-Japan NGO Partnerships on Humanitarian Responses — Lessons from 3/11,” one of a series of reports released by JCIE in conjunction with the 4th anniversary of Japan’s 3/11 disaster.
In “Korean Unification:  Before the Bonanza,” a February 12, 2015 commentary piece for the website 38 North, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) cautioned that “the economics of Korean unification cannot be discussed alone.” “Any discussion of Korea’s economic future,” she adds, “must consider the potential for what might be a truly perilous and drawn-out transition.”
In “Abe’s Third Arrow Finds its Mark,” published in the Wall Street Journal February 11, 2015, Cohort III scholar Tobias Harris (Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Teneo Intelligence) wrote that Prime Minister Abe “cleared the way for the first and perhaps most significant of the session’s structural reforms when the Central Union of Agricultural Cooperatives (commonly known as JA-Zenchu) agreed to reduce the organization’s role in overseeing local cooperatives and representing the agricultural sector in its deliberations with Tokyo.

A letter to the editor by Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) was featured in a series of responses to the January 16, 2015 New York Times op-ed “The Shape of Japan to Come” by University of Connecticut Professor Alexis Dudden. Please click here to read Dr. Hornung’s letter.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College) commented on the politics of apologies in “For Japan, Saying ‘Sorry’ Proves Politically Tricky,” published in the Wall Street Journal January 14, 2015.
In “Japan’s Discomfort Women,” Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) noted that Prime Minister Abe’s recent electoral victory gave him “a strengthened base from which to restart bilateral relations [with South Korea] and resolve the comfort women issue,” but cautioned that the path toward resolution is not easy.  Dr. Hornung suggests several steps toward resolving the comfort women issue in the article, which was published in Foreign Affairs January 13, 2015.

In a January 5, 2015 Dispatch Japan interview Cohort II scholar Jeffery Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) examined the implications of Japan’s December 2014 elections for Prime Minister Abe, his policies, the ruling coalition, and the opposition parties.
Cohort III scholar Hiroki Takeuchi is a regular contributor to the Japanese online journal Foresight, which covers domestic and international politics, economy and society. In his Foresight articles Dr. Takeuchi — an Associate Professor of Political Science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas — discusses contemporary topics related to U.S. and world politics, Japan-U.S. relations, and China-Japan-U.S. relations, sharing perspectives from the “windows of Dallas.”   Please click here for a list of Dr. Takeuchi’s articles in Japanese.

Cohort III scholar Daniel Smith (Harvard University) co-authored two articles on Japan’s 2014 parliamentary elections.  The first was published in Nikkei Business Online December 19, 2014 and can be read in Japanese here.  The second, “Abe romps, Japan yawns:  2014 Japanese parliamentary election report,” was co-authored with Ethan Scheiner (University of California, Davis) and Michael Thies (University of California, Los Angeles) and posted on the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog December 30, 2014.

 

Cohort III scholar Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University) co-authored “The Power of Japan’s Religious Party,” for the Wilson Center’s Asia Program. The December 4, 2014 article examines the role of Soka Gakkai and its affiliated party Komeito in Japanese politics.

Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Daniel Aldrich (Purdue University) and co-author Yasuyuki Sawada (University of Tokyo) discussed “The physical and social determinants of mortality in the 3.11 tsunami” in article in the January 2015 edition of Social Science & Medicine.  Please click here for more information about the article, which describes the authors’ findings about the unequal distribution of the human consequences of the March 2011 tsunami across the Tohoku region of Japan.

 

Network for the Future Cohort III scholar Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University) co-edited Komeito:  Politics and Religion in Japan [link to].  The book includes a chapter by Dr. McLaughlin on “Electioneering as Religious Practice: A History of Sōka Gakkai’s Political Activities to 1970” as well as a chapter by another Cohort III scholar, Daniel Smith (Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University), on “Party Ideals and Practical Constraints in Kōmeitō Candidate Nominations.”

 

Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin’s (Congressional Research Service) paper on Sino-Japanese cooperation in Vietnam was published as part of an Asan Forum September-October 2014 Special Forum examining Sino-Japanese competition in East Asia from different countries.

 

In “Japan Chair Platform:  Japan Matters for South Korea’s Security” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website November 10, 2014 Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) examines Japan’s significance for South Korea’s security and concludes “America’s allies need each other.  The sooner they can agree, the better.”

 

In “U.S. Comfort Women Memorials: Vehicles for Understanding and Change” (Asia Pacific Bulletin Number 275),  Cohort II scholar Mary McCarthy (Drake University) notes “there is great potential for these memorials to promote local-level initiatives that could enhance dialogue and understanding on the comfort women issue from a multi-dimensional perspective.”  Dr. McCarthy currently is a Japan Studies Visiting Fellow at the East-West Center in Washington, which published the piece August 12, 2014.

 

 In “Time for Japan’s Abe to Go Slow”, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, APCSS) observes that, by most accounts, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe  “appears to have been quite successful,” during his nearly twenty months in office.  However, Dr. Hornung cautions that Abe’s “swiftness and apparent lack of sufficient explanations with the public and stakeholders in his party are hurting him” and concludes that, “With a rising amount of LDP discontent and declining support, it behooves Abe to reconsider the speed in which he is pushing policies and prioritize his agenda.”  Dr. Hornung’s editorial was published in APCSS News July 28, 2014.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future scholars Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs), Mark Manyin (Specialist in Asian Affairs), and Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs), all with the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to an updated CRS report on U.S.-South Korea Relations published June 21, 2014.  Ms. Chanlett-Avery also contributed to a June 19, 2014 CRS report on “Thailand:  Background and U.S. Relations.

 

In “Making the Case for a More Robust Regional Security Architecture in the Asia-Pacific,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) notes that three functions performed by a regional security architecture “– facilitating cooperation, defining expectations of appropriateness, and engaging all states regardless of size — are important given the need to adapt to the new conditions of distributed power and increasingly complex security problems.”  He concludes that the United States needs to make a stronger case for an Asia-Pacific RSA “by focusing on these very basic functions.”  This editorial was published on the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies’ website June 16, 2014.

 

In a June 5, 2014 op-ed in The National Interest U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia—Pacific Center for Security Studies) takes a closer look at the incident behind the “verbal barbs”  Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese Lieutenant General Wang Guanzhong traded at the recent Shangri-La Dialogue and notes these barbs “reflect an increasingly dangerous situation playing out in the East China Sea that carries real-world consequences that may prove difficult to deescalate.” Dr. Hornrung suggests that “because the status quo is becoming increasingly risky, it behooves Beijing and Tokyo to take action to manage the situation.”

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth University) wrote about China’s “ongoing effort to wield the history weapon against Japan” and how to change the conversation in East Asia in an April 6, 2014 op-ed in Aljazeera America.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin (Congressional Research Service, CRS) and his CRS colleague Mary Beth Nikitin recently updated their report to Congress on foreign assistance to North Korea.  A pdf of the April 2, 2014 report is available atwww.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R40095.pdf.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was interviewed by Voice of America about the March meeting between President Obama, Japanese Prime Minister Abe, and South Korean President Park on the sidelines of the Nuclear Security Summit.  Please click here to listen to the March 25, 2014, segment.

 

In “Mending Japan-S.Korea Ties,” an op-ed published in the Japan Times March 7, 2014, Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described current strains in Japan-South Korea relations and said Tokyo and Seoul should “refrain from looking to the United States to mediate their dispute.” “While Washington can encourage its allies toward better behavior,” he concluded, “Park and Abe need to demonstrate leadership through words, deeds and bilateral dialogue.”

 

Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Peace Winds America) evaluated the U.S. response to Prime Minister Abe’s December 2013 visit to Yasukuni Shrine in an interview published in Dispatch Japan March 11, 2014.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was quoted in a February 22, 2014 New York Times article about the latest annual training event for U.S. Marines and soldiers from Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force, which took place in California in January and February 2014.

 

New York Times article about the latest annual training event for U.S. Marines and soldiers from Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force, which took place in California in January and February 2014.

 

Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery and Cohort I scholar Mark Manyin, both Specialists in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service (CRS), contributed to updated reports on U.S-South Korea relations and Japan-U.S. relations published in mid-February 2014.

 

Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros shares his views on Prime Minister Abe’s first year in office and his visit to Yasukuni Shrine in “Does Abe’s Rightward Shift Threaten His Legacy?,” published in the January 7 PacNet Newsletter.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) authored a recent article on China’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) in the Asahi Shimbun (subscription required) and co-authored a January 10 article on “Beijing’s Grand Strategy Failure” in The National Interest.

 

In a January 1 opinion piece in the Japan Times, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future advisory committee member Ezra Vogel (Harvard University) writes that current tensions between Japan and China “cannot be eliminated without confronting the passions stemming from unresolved historical issues that arose beginning late in the 19th century when Japan modernized first.” Dr. Vogel examines some of the difficulties between Japan and China and recommends steps each country could take to improve the relationship.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service) examines the Abe administration’s security agenda, the Futenma base controversy and other issues in “The U.S.-Japan Alliance” an updated report coauthored with Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asia Affairs, Congressional Research Service) and published December 12, 2013.

 

Cohort II scholar Andrew Oros (Washington College) was interviewed about Vice President Biden’s trip to Asia on CCTV America December 1, 2013.

 

In “Japan Chair Platform:  A Chance for Allies to Focus on Alliance Issues,” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website October 1, 2013, Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) writes that, given serious security issues in Northeast Asia, it is imperative that U.S. officials’ meetings in Seoul and Tokyo this week be “used to strengthen the separate alliances rather than discuss tertiary issues regarding territorial disputes or history.”

 

Cohort II scholar Kenji Kushida (Research Associate, Stanford University) commented on the Japanese government’s plan to build an ice wall around the Fukushima nuclear plant in a September 3, 2013 discussion on the PBS Newshour.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) commented on growing distrust of China in an August 27, 2013 article in Asia Pacific Defense Forum.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies)commented on the Senkaku Islands situation in an August 23, 2013  interview with the Asia Pacific Defense Forum.

 

Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies), contributed to a report on the possibilities and challenges of U.S.-Japan-Australia cooperation in international disaster relief in the Asia-Pacific region.  The report was a joint project of APCSS, the Association for Cooperation between Japan, U.S. and Australia (ACJUA), and Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

 

In a June 9, 2013 article in The Diplomat, U.S.-Japan Network for the Cohort II scholar Weston Konishi (Institute of Foreign Policy Analysis) compares President Obama’s June 7-8 summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping to recent bilateral meetings with his Japanese counterparts. Click here to read the article.

 

In a May 22, 2013 article in The National Interest, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described troubled relations between Japan, China and South Korea and suggested a “new approach to regional diplomacy is needed.”  He urged Seoul and Beijing to “take the lead in reaching out to Tokyo even as their disagreements over history and territory continue.” Click here to read the article.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) examined Japan’s North Korea policy in a May 23, 2013 article in World Politics Review. Click here to read the article.

 

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service) examined “North Korea:  U.S. Relations, Nuclear Diplomacy, and Internal Situation” in a recent report co-authored with Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service).

Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth College) wrote about the past and future of the Yasukuni Shrine issue in Japanese politics and East Asia’s foreign relations in “Beware the Tomb of the Known Soldier,”  published in the Spring 2013 edition of Global Asia.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar David Janes (Director, Foundation Grants, and Assistant to the President, United States-Japan Foundation) commented on “Masahiro Sasaki and the Etiquette of Reconciliation” in a March 22 essay in Deliberately Considered.

In a March 15 essay titled “Japan Chair Platform: Assessing the DPJ’s Stewardship of the Alliance,” U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffery Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) says the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) deserves more credit than it has been given for its handling of the alliance with the United States.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar James Gannon (Executive Director, Japan Center for International Exchange, JCIE) and his JCIE colleagues released the results of their latest survey on U.S. donations in response to Japan’s March 2011 “triple disaster.”  The report released two years since the tragedy estimates that Americans have donated more than $712 million for disaster relief and recovery efforts in Japan, a record amount for a disaster in a developed nation.

Japanese and U.S. goals for the February 22 meeting between Prime Minister Abe and President Obama were among the topics U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) discussed in an interview published by Dispatch Japan February 18.

Network for the Future Scholar Mary Alice Haddad (Cohort I) was interviewed on “Environmental Politics in Northeast Asia: Lessons Learned for North America” by Lynann Butkiewicz at the National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR). A transcript of the interview on February 15 is available here.

In “Japan Chair Platform:  The LDP Rises Again,” published on the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ website February 13, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Robert Pekkanen (Associate Professor, University of Washington) examines the LDP’s December electoral victory and what lies ahead for the party.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor, Dartmouth College) analyzes the latest North Korean nuclear test in “Pyongyang’s Nuclear Logic,” published in Foreign Affairs on February 14, 2013.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) writes that China and Japan need rules regulating the interaction of their vessels and aircraft to reduce the possibility of conflict in the East China Sea. His commentary was published in The National Interest on February 11, 2013.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Mireya Solis (Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies, Senior Fellow, Center for Northeast Asia Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution and Associate Professor, American University) examines four major trade initiatives Japan could potentially negotiate this year in “Japan’s Trade Policy in 2013: Possibilities and Pitfalls,” published February 1, 2013.

Network for the Future Scholars Andrew Oros (Washington College) and Weston Konishi (Institute of Foreign Policy Analysis) and U.S.-Korea Scholar-Policymaker Nexus Senior Advisor David Kang contributed to a recent NBR Asia Policy Book Review of Jing Sun’s “Japan and China’s Charm Rivals: Soft Power and Regional Diplomacy.”

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Jennifer Lind (Associate Professor, Dartmouth College) says that denying Japan’s past obscures “…not only the huge distinctions between the Japan of old and the Japan of today but also the distinctions between it and its contemporary rivals.” Her op-ed was published in the Washington Post on January 25, 2013.

Japan as a Consequential Power. U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Associate Professor, Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) described Japan’s continued strategic importance in security and diplomatic spheres in a recent contribution to Is “Japan in Decline?,” a series assessing Japan’s future on the Council for Foreign Relations’ Asia Unbound blog.

U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I scholar Kay Shimuzu (Assistant Professor of Political Science, Columbia University) examined the content and implications of Prime Minister Abe’s economic plans in “2013, Year of Japan’s Revival? Abenomics and the Politics of Growth,” in the January 17 edition of Japan Chair Platform published by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

In an op-ed published in the online version of the New York Times January 1, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Mary McCarthy (Assistant Professor, Drake University) frames the comfort women issue as an opportunity for Japan to lead on human rights. Click here to read the article.

The results of Japan’s December 16 election reflect a rejection of the other parties rather than support for the LDP, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Jeffrey Hornung (Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies) commented in a December 20 CNN article, “LDP won a landslide, but not a mandate.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Kenneth McElwain (University of Michigan) explains how voter disenchantment produced the LDP’s victory in “Japan’s Disappointment Election,” a December 19 article in the web magazine Deliberately Considered.  Click here to read the article.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Robert Pekkanen (University of Washington) explained how a weak and divided opposition led to an LDP victory in December 18 commentary for the National Bureau of Asian Research,  “The 2012 Japanese Election Paradox: How the LDP Lost Voters and Won the Election.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Weston Konishi (Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis) commented on how U.S. policymakers view the LDP’s December 16 victory in an interview with AFP published December 17.  Read it here.

Network for the Future Cohort II scholar Jeffrey Hornung has written an article “Increasing Security Awareness Among the Japanese Public”on the CSIS Japan Chair Platform (December 13, 2012).  Jeffrey Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) in Honolulu, HI and concurrently holds the position of Adjunct Fellow with the Office of the Japan Chair at CSIS in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Ezra Vogel’s op-ed, “Why Japanese Life is Good,” was published in the Washington Post on December 16, 2012.  Dr. Vogel is the Henry Ford II Research Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus for the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University and on the advisory committee for the Network for the Future program.

Network for the Future Cohort II scholar David Janes contributed a December 7 guest post “Japan, Beyond Tomorrow” on Asia Unbound. This is one of a series of posts on the topic “Is Japan in Decline?” David Janes is the director of foundation grants and assistant to the president of the United States – Japan Foundation.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar David Janes invites statements, suggestions, and stories on how non-governmental organizations have played a role in de-escalating conflict and promoting peaceful reconciliation. Read his December 5th article, “Putting World War II to “Rest?” Opening a Dialogue about Northeast Asia” on Deliberately Considered.  David Janes is the director of foundation grants and assistant to the president of the United States – Japan Foundation.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Dr. Daniel Aldrich was interviewed by Radio New Zealand on Japan’s anti-nuclear movement. The program, called ‘Japan’s Nuclear Rethink,’ was aired on December 3rd 2012 and can be found here. Dr. Aldrich is an associate professor of political science at Purdue University currently living in Japan as a Fulbright research fellow at the University of Tokyo.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Annika Culver’s (Assistant Professor, University of North Caroline at Pembroke) review of Remote Homeland, Recovered Borderland: Manchus, Manchoukuo, and Manchuria, 1907-1985 by Shao Dan was published on H-Net (Humanities & Social Sciences Online) in October.  To read the review, click here.

Dr. Culver also participated in an October 12-14, 2012 panel on “Women, Politics, and the New and Old Proletarian Literature,” at the 21st Annual Association for Japanese Literary Studies Conference at Ohio State University.  An abstract of her paper on “Japanese Women and Rural Settlement in Wartime Manchukuo: Gendered Expressions of Labor and Productivity in Manshu Gurafu [Manchuria Graph], 1940-1944” is available here.

Jeffrey W. Hornung, Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar, has written an article on a potential Abe administration in Japan. The article was featured on CNN World on December 3rd 2012. Jeffrey W. Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu and an Adjunct Fellow with the Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. The article, ‘Back to the future in Japan,’ can be viewed here.

Dr. Daniel Aldrich, Network for the Future Cohort I participant and associate professor of political science at Purdue University, will participate in the UNU-ISP Symposium – Rebuilding after 3/11: Vulnerability and Empowerment at the UN University Headquarters in Tokyo on November 30th. He will be speaking on the topic of ‘Social Capital’s Role in Building Resilience’.

Mireya Solis, Network for the Future Cohort I participant, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and associate professor at American University, was quoted in an article in the Washington Post, published November 19th. The article,On Asia trip, Obama presses economic counter to China,’ can be viewed here.

Network for the Future Cohort I Scholar Llewelyn Hughes participated in “Made in Japan: A Showcase of Solutions for Climate Change,” a panel discussion broadcast November 15, 2012, as part of The Climate Reality Project’s “24 Hours of Reality.”  To view the discussion, click here. [http://climaterealityproject.org/24hours2012/live-broadcast/hour-11-japan-south-korea/]

Network for the Future Cohort I and II participants Phillip Lipscy and Kenji Kushida, respectively, wrote an opinion piece, “Protecting Nuclear Plants From Nature’s Worst”, which was published in the Washington Post on October 31, 2012.  To read the article, please click here.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Weston Konishi (Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, IFPA) is co-editor of a recently released report on “U.S.-Japan Peacebuilding Cooperation: Roles and Recommendations toward a Whole-of-Alliance Approach.” The report, co-edited by Hoshino Toshiya (Dean, Osaka School of International Public Policy at Osaka University) is the result of a two-year IFPA research and dialogue project aimed in part at helping narrow strategy gaps between the U.S. and Japan in the area of peacebuilding in post-conflict or highly vulnerable countries.

Network for the Future Cohort II Scholar Andrew Oros (Associate Professor, Washington College) discussed his work on Japan-China relations in two China Net TV programs this week.   Click here to listen to his October 21 comments on CCT’V’s World Insight program and here to listen to his October 22 comments on CCTV’s Dialogue program.

Network for the Future Cohort II participant Jeffrey Hornung has contributed a chapter on Japan and the Asia-Pacific in “From APEC 2011 to APEC 2012: American and Russian Perspectives on Asia-Pacific Security and Cooperation,” a publication produced jointly by the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and the Far Eastern Federal University. Dr. Hornung’s chapter examines Japan’s economic and security challenges and the policies Japan is prioritizing to address these challenges.

Dangerous Waters Network for the Future Cohort I participant Phillip Lipscy participated in a live debate on September 19, 2012, on France 24, the government-owned international news channel of France.  Dr. Lipscy is assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and the Thomas Rohlen center fellow at the Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center.

U.S., China file dueling complaints as trade tensions heat up Network for the Future Cohort I participant Phillip Lipscy was interviewed by the Los Angeles Times on September 18, 2012.  Dr. Lipscy is assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and the Thomas Rohlen center fellow at the Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center.

Immigration and Citizenship in Japan by U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant Erin Chung, was recently published in Japanese. Dr. Chung is the Charles D. Miller associate professor of East Asian politics at Johns Hopkins University. For information about the Japanese translation of her first book, please click here.

Erin Chung, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Charles D. Miller associate professor of East Asian politics at Johns Hopkins University, has coauthored an article on “Citizenship and Marriage in a Globalizing World: Multicultural Families and Monocultural National Laws in Korea and Japan.” The article will be published in the Winter 2012 issue of the Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies. Please click here to read an abstract.

PacNet #47R – Responses to PacNet #47-  Korea-Japan: Time for Outside Mediation? Weston S. Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.  He has co-authored a response with Carole Shaw to an article: PacNet#47 -Korea-Japan: Time for Outside Mediation? PacNet is a weekly publication generated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).  His response was published on September 6th, 2012.

Jennifer Lind, assistant professor at the Department of Government, Dartmouth College, and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed in Korea Kontext, a podcast of the Korea Economic Institute.  The interview covered Dr. Lind’s opinion on the DPRK government’s resilience and if Kim Jong-un will be able to make substantial reforms.  Listen to the interview on the KEI website.

KEI also posted a Q&A with Dr. Lind on their blog The Peninsula concerning apologies in Northeast Asia.  The post was published on August 30, 2012.  Read it here

South Korea’s Irresponsible Diplomacy With Japan Jeffrey Hornung is Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant. His article was published in The Diplomat on September 4th, 2012.

Japan’s Possible Entry Into the Trans-Pacific Partnership and Its Implications Mark Manyin, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant and Specialist in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service, has authored a new report with his colleague William Cooper (Specialist in International Trade and Finance). It was published on August 24, 2012.

Weston Konishi was interviewed by Mainichi Shimbun and it was published on August 19, 2012. Weston Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.  In the interview, Weston argues that Japan’s territorial issues have to be seen in the context of its ongoing historical disputes, which complicate a diplomatic solution to the crises. A more consistent approach toward resolving historical disputes would place Japan in a stronger position to confront its territorial disputes with its neighbors.  A copy of the article in Japanese may be found here.

Emma Chanlett-Avery, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Specialist in Asian Affairs at the Congressional Research Service, has authored a new report with her colleague Ian Rinehart (Analyst in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service). The August 3, 2012 report, ”The U.S. Military Presence in Okinawa and the Futenma Base Controversy,” examines the current status of the base relocation agreement as well as the strategic, historic and political context for the U.S. military presence in Okinawa. To read the report, please click here.

Andrew Oros, Network for the Future Fellow and Associate Professor, Washington College, has written a book review of Claude Meyer’s new Columbia University Press book, China or Japan: Which Will Lead Asia?  Read the review here.

Andrew Oros was interview on NPR/WBEZ’s Worldview radio program on August 21 about the Senkaku dispute and broader issues between Japan and China. Find the program here. Andrew Oros is a Network for the Future Cohort II participant and Associate Professor at Washington College.

Better Public Diplomacy in East Asia Weston S. Konishi is Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future. A commentary he coauthored with Greer Meisels on US and its allies in Asia was published in The National Interest on August 14, 2012.

Thinking through Japan-ROK security relations Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant. He co-authored the article which was published in The Japan Times on August 1, 2012.

Why China Should Do More In Afghanistan Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Diplomat on August 1, 2012.

Jeffrey Hornung,  Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant, was quoted in Japan-South Korea Relations: Time to Open Both Eyes, an article by Ralph A. Cossa, President, Pacific Forum CSIS.  The article is published by the Council on Foreign Relations.

Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, quoted in Nuclear: Report blames Fukushima disaster on top levels of utilities, regulators, by Nathanael Massey, published in ClimateWire, July 6, 2012.

Lost Chance for Tokyo-Seoul Security Relations Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Japan Times  on June 18, 2012.

Japan’s Sensible New Defense Chief Jeffrey Hornung is an Associate Professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His op-ed was published in The Diplomat on June 16, 2012.

Hard lessons for U.S. Nuclear Safety from Fukushima Meltdown Daniel Aldrich is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  His op-ed on lessons learned from Fukushima was posted on CNN May 25, 2012.

Okinawa and the Future of the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, discusses the U.S. military presence in Okinawa in an interview published by the National Bureau of Asian Research May 11, 2012.

From Rhetoric to Reality: Foreign-Policy Making under the Democratic Party of Japan, Weston Konishi, Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant, examines the Democratic Party of Japan’s foreign-policy making since 2009.  This report was published by the Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis in April 2012.

Japan PM in U.S. to Turn Page for Alliance Weston Konishi, Associate Director of Asia-Pacific Studies, Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, and a participant in Cohort II of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, was interviewed by Agence France-Presse for an article about Prime Minister Noda’s Washington visit and the agreement on U.S. troop realignment. The article appeared in the Bangkok Post April 30, 2012.

U.S.-Japan Summit Meeting Nicholas Szechenyi is a senior fellow and deputy director of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.  He is also a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  This was published on the CSIS publications page on April 25, 2012.

Op-Ed: North Korea Gets Too Many Second Chances Jennifer Lind is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  She was interviewed by Neil Conan on his NPR radio show, Talk of the Nation, on April 16, 2012.

Why North Korea Gets Away With It Jennifer Lind is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and a Network for the Future Cohort I participant.  Her article was published in Foreign Affairs on April 12, 2012.

Noda has an SDF moment Jeffrey Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Japan Times  on April 7, 2012.

How the F-35 May Hurt U.S.-Japan Ties Jeffery Hornung is an associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, and Network for the Future Cohort II participant.  His article was published in The Diplomat on April 5, 2012.

Aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed by Voice of Russia on March 15, 2012.

Building Democracy in Japan Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor at Wesleyan University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant, examines the democratic transition in Japan and the road that led to the transformation of the nation’s political culture. The book was published in 2012 by Cambridge University Press.

One Year Later: Rebuilding After the Great Tohoku Earthquake James Gannon, a participant in Cohort I of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, was interviewed in PhilanTopic about progress rebuilding in the Tohoku region.  The article was published March 9, 2012.

What Japan Must Do Now by Jeffrey Hornung, U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort II participant and associate professor at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. The article, published in The Diplomat on March 10, 2012, reviews the current state of affairs in Japan one year after the devastating earthquake and emphasizes the importance of political decisions in the wake of disaster.

Fukushima One Year Later  Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and Network for the Future Cohort I participant, was interviewed by Laura Araki of the National Bureau of Asian Research on March 6, 2012, concerning the lasting impact of the March 11 earthquake in Japan and the continuing recovery efforts. Read the full interview on the National Bureau of Asian Research website.

Japan’s Nuclear Disaster Inspires Civil Society to Act, Engage. Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Cohort I participant, comments on changes in civil society following the 2011 earthquake and nuclear reactor tragedy in Japan. The article was released on March 1, 2012.

Learning to Share the Stage by Jennifer Lind, assistant professor of government at Dartmouth College and  U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Published by The New York Times on February 5, 2012.

Kathryn Ibata-Arens, a participant in Cohort I of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future, is among the members of a “U.S.-Japan Innovation and Entrepreneurship Council” launched in Tokyo January 25, 2012. The U.S. Department of State and Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry launched the Council as part of the U.S.-Japan Dialogue to Promote Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Job Creation. Read the U.S. Embassy press release here (Japanese here).

Japan Moves Forward: Views from the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future  This publication compiles policy papers from each of the fifteen participants in the inaugural group of the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future.

Japan Chair Platform: Time to Acknowledge the Realignment Impasse by Jeffrey W. Hornung, U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.

US-Japan Cooperation on the Reform of International Organizations by Philip Lipscy, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.   This working paper is part of the Japan Center for International Exchange  new study on “An Enhanced Agenda for US-Japan Partnership.”

A New Framework for US-Japan Development Cooperation by James Gannon, Executive Director, JCIE/USA, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.This working paper is part of the Japan Center for International Exchange  new study on “An Enhanced Agenda for US-Japan Partnership.”

Japan’s Sputnik Moment by Dr. Kathryn Ibata-Arens, an associate professor at DePaul University, and U.S.- Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  This paper will be part of a complination of policy papers published and presented at a January 2012 public symposium in Washington, D.C.

“Tepco ‘Deal With Devil’ Signals End to Japan’s Postwar Era” New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Published by Bloomberg News on October 21, 2011.

“Resource Nationalism in the Asia-Pacific: Why Does It Matter?” New commentary by Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor, George Washington University, and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow. Appears in the  National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR) Energy Security Report, “Asia’s Rising Energy and Resource Nationalism,” published September 2011.

“Neighbors connecting in disasters”. New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Published in The Baltimore Sun on August 26, 2011.

“Make nice with your neighbors: they’re the key to surviving a disaster”.  New commentary by Daniel Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University, U.S. AID Fellow and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Aired on 89.3  KCPP Southern California Public Radio on August 25, 2011.

“Nuclear Power’s Future in Japan and Abroad: The Fukushima Accident in Social and Political Perspective”.  Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Associate Professor, Purdue University and US-Japan Network for the Future Fellow.  Published in ParisTech Review on August 25, 2011.


“POINT OF VIEW/ Daniel P. Aldrich and Mika Shimizu: Smaller is better — Private and individual philanthropy after the 3/11 disaster.”
Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, August 9, 2011.

Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow interviewed in “The Future of Nuclear Energy in japan.” by Chris Acheson, published in the National Bureau of Asian Research, August 1, 2011.

“The Role of Communities in Post-Disaster Recovery.” Video commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S. – Japan network for the Future Fellow, published by the U.S. Department of State’s Media Hub in Japan, on YouTube, July, 2011.

“After a half century of unwavering support, Japan should become free, says prime minister.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in WBEZ91.5, July 29, 2011.

“Contribute to renewal not just recovery.” Commentary by Mary Alice Haddad, Associate Professor, Wesleyan University,  Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, July 15, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “The Key to Disaster Survival? Friends and Neighbors” by Shankar Vedantam, published in National Public Radio, July 4, 2011.

“Future Fission: Why Japan Won’t Abandon Nuclear Power.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Global Asia, June, 2011.

“The Tohoku Disaster: Crisis ‘Windows,’ Complexity, and Social Capital.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Items & Issues, The Social Science Research Council, June, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “In Japan, a Culture That Promotes Nuclear Dependency” by Martin Fackler and Norimitsu Onishi, published in The New York Times , May 30, 2011.

“A crisis silver lining: Volunteerism, smarter building and open debate.” Commentary by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, May 05, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Disasters strike; Purdue experts have been busy by Eric Weddle,” published in the Journal & Courier Online, April 20, 2011

“Implications of Japan’s nuclear crisis for Korea”, Article by Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow and Mi-kyoung Kim, published in the Korea Times, April 17, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “McDonald’s Wage for Nuclear Job Shows Japan Towns May Fade” by John Brinsley and Aki Ito, published in the Bloomberg Business and Financial News, April 10, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in  “Purdue professor shares disaster, nuclear expertise” by Eric Weddle, published in the Journal & Courier Online, April 1, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in ”Public Anger Against Nuclear Power Mounts In Japan” by Anthony Kuhn, published in National Public Radio, March 31, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed in “Nuclear power shouldn’t be ignored” by Chris Flynn, published in The Exponent Online, March 31, 2011

Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow interviewed on The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell(Video) published by MSNBC, March 22, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in Fukushima, Indian Point and Fantasy by Peter Applebome, published in the New York Times, March 20, 2011

With a Mighty Hand: The Japanese government’s influential and manipulative role in commercial nuclear power,” article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in The New Republic, March 19, 2011.

Readiness Mitigates Japan’s Earthquake Aftermath,” Commentary by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor, Wesleyan University, Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the The Hartford Courant, March 19, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in ‘Too Late’ for Some Tsunami Victims to Rebuild in Japan by Michael Wines, published in the New York Times, March 19, 2011.

Where We Live: Japan, One Week Later: What CT residents are doing and can do to help,” (Audio) Interview by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor, Wesleyan University, Abe Fellow, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Your Public Media’s Where We Live, March 18, 2011.

The Economic Impact of Japan’s Earthquake,” Interview featuring Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Japan Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies from The Diane Rehm Show, published by WAMU 88.5. March 16, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed in Japan Disaster Global Impact (Video), published by CNBC, March 15, 2011.

“Purdue Political Science Professor Daniel Aldrich assesses the current state of Japan in the terrible earthquake and tsunami aftermath,” Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed by Denis Prior, WSBT News Radio, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Purdue professor weighs in on partial nuclear meltdown in Japan,” by Alisha Yadav, published in the Purdue Exponent, ‎March 14, 2011‎

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Stricken Japan Reactor Just Passed Probe for Next Decade,” by Jason Clenfield and Yuriy Hember, Published in Bloomberg Businessweek, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “Special Edition of Our World” by SarahWilliams, published in Voice of America Radio, March 14, 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “IAEA: No Indication of Nuclear Reactor Meltdown in Japan,” by JulieAnn McKellogg, published in Voice of America, March 14, 2011.

Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Associate Professor, DePaul University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, quoted in “JA Delegation Safe After Massive Temblor,” by Gwen Muranaka, published inRafu Shimpo – Los Angeles Japanese Daily News, March 11, 2011.

ABC7 talks to Chicago prof in Japan as aftershock hits,” Interview with Kathryn Ibata-Arens, Associate Professor, DePaul University, and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published by ABC7 News, WLS-TV Chicago, IL, March 11, 2011.

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, Interview, background for Dan McFeely, “Indiana Schools track safety of students in Japan,” Indianapolis Star 11 March 2011

Daniel Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, interviewed for “Professor: quake like atomic weapons,” by Tiffanie Dismore, published in WLFI 18 News Program, March 11, 2011.

“Preparing for North Korean Collapse,” Commentary by  Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, December 17, 2010.

“G-20 puts Asia in limelight, but Japan in the dark,” Commentary by Mireya Solis, Assistant Professor, American University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, December 8, 2010. (Japanese)

“Reinvigorating U.S.-Japan Policy Dialogue and Study,” Report drafted by James Gannon, Executive Director, Japan Center for International Exchange (JCIE/USA) and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, December 2010.

“Can the U.S. and Japan Finally Reconcile Over Hiroshima?” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Atlantic, November 12, 2010.

“Last Stop: Yokohama,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, November 2, 2010.

“The Once and Future Kim,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Foreign Affairs, October 25, 2010.

“The Power of People: Social Capital and Post-Disaster Recovery,” Article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at the Global Policy Research Institute.

“A Glimmer of Success,” Article by Matthew D. Marr, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Florida International University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Miami Herald, October 8, 2010.

“Resolve Okinawa Base Dispute? Yes, You, Kan,” Article by Ken Haig, Assistant Professor of Political Studies, Bard College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, September 13, 2010.

“Apology Diplomacy at Hiroshima,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Atlantic, August 13, 2010.

“Symbolic Gestures: Lessons for East Asia from a Compromise on History in America,” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in Global Asia, Summer 2010

“U.S. Nuclear Renaissance or Still Muddling Through?” Article by Daniel P. Aldrich, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Purdue University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, June 2, 2010.

“Political Turmoil in Japan,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, June 2, 2010

“U.S.-Japan: A Step Closer to Resolving the Impasse over Futenma,” Commentary by Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Fellow, Office of the Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published online at CSIS, May 25, 2010

“Virginia’s Lessons for East Asia’s ‘History Problems,'” Article by Jennifer Lind, Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, May 6, 2010

“A New Era of Japanese Foreign Policy,” Article by Mary Alice Haddad, Assistant Professor of Government at Wesleyan University and U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Fellow, published in the Asahi Shimbun, March 30, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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